Root response to aerobic conditions in rice, estimated by Comair root length scanner and scanner-based image analysis

Yoichiro Kato, Midori Okami, Ryosuke Tajima, Daisuke Fujita, Nobuya Kobayashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Precise evaluation of root system architecture is important for understanding how rice plants are adapted to non-puddled and non-flooded conditions in aerobic culture. The objective of this study was to compare estimates of root length by the Comair root length scanner and a flat bed scanner and image analysis software in rice grown in aerobic, near-saturated and flooded fields. Fine roots (diameter < 0.2. mm) accounted for >80% of root length in all hydrological conditions. The Comair root length scanner detected fewer fine roots than the software; root length estimated by the Comair scanner was between that of roots wider than 0.1. mm and roots wider than 0.2. mm estimated by image analysis software. Importantly, total root length under aerobic and near-saturated conditions was 10-30% of that under flooding by image analysis software, but not by the Comair scanner. Digital image analysis detected genotypic differences in fine root development in the subsurface layer in aerobic culture that the Comair root length scanner would have missed. Although root length measurement by image analysis software is still under development, this new tool will facilitate the phenotyping of root system architecture and shed light on the roles of fine roots in water-saving rice cultivation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)194-198
Number of pages5
JournalField Crops Research
Volume118
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Aug 1

Keywords

  • Aerobic rice
  • Comair
  • IR64
  • Introgression lines
  • Upland rice
  • Water-saving technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Soil Science

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