Resource use of insect seed predators during general flowering and seeding events in a Bornean dipterocarp rain forest

M. Nakagawa, T. Itioka, K. Momose, T. Yumoto, F. Komai, K. Morimoto, B. H. Jordal, M. Kato, H. Kaliang, A. A. Hamid, T. Inoue, T. Nakashizuka

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    37 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Insect seed predators of 24 dipterocarp species (including the genera of Dipterocarpus, Dryobalanops and Shorea) and five species belonging to the Moraceae, Myrtaceae, Celastraceae and Sapotaceae were investigated. In a tropical lowland dipterocarp forest in Sarawak, Malaysia, these trees produced seeds irregularly but intensely during general flowering and seeding events in 1996 and/or 1998. Dipterocarp seeds were preyed on by 51 insect species (11 families), which were roughly classified into three taxonomic groups: smaller moths (Tortricidae, Pyralidae, Crambidae, Immidae, Sesiidae and Cosmopterigidae), scolytids (Scolytidae) and weevils (Curculionidae, Apionidae, Anthribidae, and Attelabidae). Although the host-specificity of invertebrate seed predators has been assumed to be high in tropical forests, it was found that the diet ranges of some insect predators were relatively wide and overlapped one another. Most seed predators that were collected in both study years changed their diets between general flowering and seeding events. The results of cluster analyses, based on the number of adults of each predator species that emerged from 100 seeds of each tree species, suggested that the dominant species was not consistent, alternating between the two years.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)455-466
    Number of pages12
    JournalBulletin of Entomological Research
    Volume93
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2003 Oct 1

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Agronomy and Crop Science
    • Insect Science

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