Replacing conventional fuels in USA, Europe, and UK with plastic pyrolysis gases – Part II: Multi-index interchangeability methods

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13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The global increase in natural gas (NG) consumption and its steady decline in availability have spurred the search for new or alternative energy sources, such as pyrolysis gases. This article examines whether it is possible to burn pyrolysis gases from common plastic wastes in conventional burners without any adjustment to burner design. To determine the interchangeability of individual gases, several multi-index methods applicable to combustion devices in Europe, the USA, and the UK were used. This report is a continuation of a previous article (Part I) discussing the results of graphical methods for determining interchangeability. Similar to Part I, the results here imply that poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) gases produced at a minimum of 700 °C have the highest replacement potential, and gases produced by polystyrene (PS) pyrolysis at 900 °C also conform with replacement requirements. For plastics mixtures, gases generated by pyrolysis at a minimum of 700 °C would be suitable alternatives to NG. These findings may contribute to plastic waste reduction as well as the discussion of reducing NG consumption. There is significant potential for follow-up research in this area, because the replacement of conventional fuels with gases obtained from wastes has not yet been sufficiently explored.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1128-1145
Number of pages18
JournalEnergy Conversion and Management
Volume126
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Oct 15

Keywords

  • Flame flashback
  • Flame lifting
  • Natural gas
  • Polymers
  • Thermal processes
  • Waste plastics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Nuclear Energy and Engineering
  • Fuel Technology
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology

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