Removal of heavy metals and sewage sludge using the mud snail, Cipangopaludina chinensis malleata REEVE, in paddy fields as artificial wetlands

Y. Kurihara, Takao Suzuki

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The effects of the application of reed-sewage sludge compost on the heavy metal incorporation and the growth of young snails born from the adult mud snails, Cipangopaludina chinensis malleata REEVE, put into submerged paddy soil were investigated. The biomass and growth of the snails in paddy soil with compost were superior to those in soil without compost. The Zn and Cu concentrations in the flesh portion of snails were extremely high as compared with those in the paddy soil surrounding the snails. This may be because snails ingest sewage sludge which is a main organic component of the composts and sewage sludge usually contains large amounts of Zn and Cu, suggesting that this type of snail may be useful in eliminating sewage sludge and Zn and Cu in paddy soil when composted sewage sludge has been applied.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationWater Science and Technology
    Pages281-286
    Number of pages6
    Volume19
    Edition12
    Publication statusPublished - 1987 Dec 1
    EventWaste Stab Ponds, Proc of an IAWPRC Spec Conf - Lisbon, Port
    Duration: 1987 Jun 291987 Jul 2

    Other

    OtherWaste Stab Ponds, Proc of an IAWPRC Spec Conf
    CityLisbon, Port
    Period87/6/2987/7/2

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Environmental Engineering
    • Water Science and Technology

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  • Cite this

    Kurihara, Y., & Suzuki, T. (1987). Removal of heavy metals and sewage sludge using the mud snail, Cipangopaludina chinensis malleata REEVE, in paddy fields as artificial wetlands. In Water Science and Technology (12 ed., Vol. 19, pp. 281-286)