Relationships Between Survival and Oral Status, Swallowing Function, and Oral Intake Level in Older Patients with Aspiration Pneumonia

Taku Suzuki, Takanori Tsujimura, Jin Magara, Naohito Hao, Naru Shiraishi, Kazuya Maekawa, Kazuo Matsushima, Makoto Inoue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The factors affecting the survival of patients with aspiration pneumonia (AP) remain unclear. This study aimed to determine whether factors, including oral status, swallowing function, and oral intake level, were related to survival outcomes in older patients hospitalized for AP. The study enrolled patients with AP who were admitted to our hospital between February 2017 and November 2019. Patients were divided into two groups based on the 90-day mortality after the first swallowing function evaluation: survivors and deceased. The data were compared between the two groups. A total of 29 patients were diagnosed with AP. Of these patients, 13 died within 90 days. The numbers of patients who could not use removable dentures and required sputum suctioning and had cough reflex at rest were significantly higher in the deceased than in the survivors. The salivary pooling and pharyngeal clearance scores evaluated by videoendoscopy, International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative Functional Diet Scale score determined after swallowing function evaluation, and consciousness level were significantly worse in the deceased than in the survivors. There were significant differences in patients’ oral status, swallowing function, oral intake level, and consciousness level between the survivors and deceased.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDysphagia
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Aspiration pneumonia
  • Oral intake level
  • Oral status
  • Survival
  • Swallowing function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Gastroenterology
  • Speech and Hearing

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