Relationship between temporomandibular joint pain and magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders

Keisuke Higuchi, M. Chiba, Y. Sai, Y. Yamaguchi, S. Nogami, K. Yamauchi, T. Takahashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings related to temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain. This study included 245 joints of 152 patients with temporomandibular disorders with anterior disc displacement; of these, 129 joints had joint pain whereas 116 joints had no joint pain. MRI was used to evaluate the reduction of anterior disc displacement, joint effusion, mandible condylar morphology, bone marrow oedema of the mandibular condyle, and signal intensity of the posterior disc attachment (PDA) on fat-suppressed T2-weighted images. The odds ratio (OR) for each MRI variable for the pain group versus the no pain group was computed using logistic regression analysis. Univariate logistic regression analysis showed significant correlations between TMJ pain and all MRI findings. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed significant correlations with joint effusion (P = 0.03, OR 2.21), bone marrow oedema (P < 0.001, OR 11.75), and signal intensity of the PDA (P < 0.001, OR 6.21). These results suggest that bone marrow oedema, high signal intensity of the PDA on fat-suppressed T2-weighted images, and joint effusion, in descending order of influence, are factors related to TMJ pain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)230-236
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Feb

Keywords

  • bone marrow oedema
  • joint effusion
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • posterior disc attachment
  • temporomandibular joint pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oral Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

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