Relationship between smoking and multiple colorectal cancers in patients with Japanese Lynch syndrome: A cross-sectional study conducted by the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum

Kohji Tanakaya, Yoichi Furukawa, Yusuke Nakamura, Keiji Hirata, Naohiro Tomita, Kazuo Tamura, Kokichi Sugano, Chikashi Ishioka, Teruhiko Yoshida, Hideyuki Ishida, Toshiaki Watanabe, Kenichi Sugihara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The positive correlation between smoking and cancer risk is well estimated in sporadic colorectal cancer, whereas little is known with regard to Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal cancer. A total of 118 familial colorectal cancer patients from the Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer Registry and Genetic Testing Project of the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum, were assessed to determinewhether smoking alters the incidence ofmultiple colorectal cancers. Inmale patientswith Lynch syndrome (n = 29), the incidence ofmultiple colorectal cancers in patients who had ever smoked (smoking duration: median of 19 years) was higher than that in those who never smoked (58.8% vs. 10.0%, P = 0.02). The cumulative risk for metachronous colorectal cancer was significantly higher in male Lynch syndrome patients who had previously smoked than in those who had never smoked (P = 0.03). Our data suggest that long-term cigarette smoking might be a strong risk factor for the development of multiple colorectal cancers in male Lynch syndrome patients.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberhyu218
Pages (from-to)307-310
Number of pages4
JournalJapanese journal of clinical oncology
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Mar 1

Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer
  • Lynch syndrome
  • Male
  • Multiple cancer
  • Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cancer Research

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