Relation between synchronized and self-paced response in preschoolers' rhythmic movement

Masayuki Kumai, Kuniaki Sugai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Regulation of the rhythmic movement of 29 preschoolers ages 3 to 6 years was studied in connection with self-paced response. An Auditory Pulse condition presented the pulse audibly, a Visual Pulse condition presented the pulse visibly, and a Moving Visual Target condition presented the repetitive movement of a visual target. We used a Quick Tempo condition in which the interstimulus interval was slightly different from the average self-paced tapping rate at which each subject felt comfortable, and a Slow Tempo in which the interval was considerably different. The error in the interresponse interval of tapping, i.e., the time gap between the mean interresponse and interstimulus intervals, was calculated as an indicator of regulation. The error in the former decreased across age groups only in the Slow Tempo condition. In the Slow-Tempo Visual-Pulse condition in which the error in the interresponse interval was particularly large, the younger subjects tended to respond at a rate near the self-paced response. In both tempos, the error in the interresponse interval in the Moving Visual Target condition was much the same as in the Auditory Pulse condition and was statistically smaller than in the Visual Pulse condition. These results may suggest that one of the important factors in the development of preschoolers' synchronization with physical rhythm is an ability to modify or restrain the self-paced response and that additional information from movement of the visual target could assist them externally in regulating movement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1327-1337
Number of pages11
JournalPerceptual and motor skills
Volume85
Issue number3 PART II
Publication statusPublished - 1997 Dec 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Sensory Systems

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