Regional changes in human cerebral blood flow during dipyridamole stress: Neural activation in the thalamus and prefrontal cortex

Hiroshi Ito, Ikuo Yokoyama, Yoshikazu Tamura, Toshibumi Kinoshita, Jun Hatazawa, Ryuta Kawashima, Hidehiro Iida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intravenous dipyridamole increases the concentration of circulating adenosine and produces coronary vasodilation. However, it decreases global cerebral blood flow (CBF) due to hyperventilation side effect of adenosine. In the present study, changes in regional CBF during dipyridamole stress were identified in detail. In 11 healthy men (51-71 years of age), CBF was measured by positron emission tomography with oxygen-15-labeled water at rest (baseline) and during dipyridamole stress. All images were normalized to global CBF and transformed to standard brain anatomy. A t map between baseline and dipyridamole stress conditions was then created on a pixel-by-pixel basis. CBF was globally decreased during dipyridamole stress. However, a significant relative increase in CBF was observed bilaterally in the thalamus and prefrontal cortex, indicating neural activation in these regions. Adenosine plays an important role in the production of anginal pain by stimulation of A1 adenosine receptors. Neural activation in the thalamus and prefrontal cortex during angina pectoris has been reported. Although no subject felt chest pain during dipyridamole stress, neural activation in the thalamus and prefrontal cortex indicates that stimulation of A1 adenosine receptors during dipyridamole stress may produce input from the heart to the thalamus through the vagal fiber.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)788-793
Number of pages6
JournalNeuroImage
Volume16
Issue number3 I
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002 Jan 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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