Reduced sleep efficiency, measured using an objective device, was related to an increased prevalence of home hypertension in Japanese adults

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Few studies have reported the relationship between reduced sleep efficiency and the prevalence of hypertension independent of sleep duration in Japan. This study aimed to evaluate whether reduced sleep efficiency, measured using an objective device for >1 week, was related to an increased prevalence of hypertension independent of sleep duration in the general Japanese population. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 904 participants aged ≥20 years who lived in Miyagi Prefecture, Japan. Sleep efficiency was measured using a contactless biomotion sleep sensor for 10 continuous days. The participants were classified into two groups according to their sleep efficiency: reduced (<90%) or not reduced (≥90%). Hypertension was defined as morning home blood pressure ≥135/85 mmHg or self-reported treatment for hypertension. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the relationship between sleep efficiency and hypertension adjusted for potential confounders. The results showed that two hundred and ninety-four individuals (32.5%) had reduced sleep efficiency, and 331 (36.6%) had hypertension. Individuals with reduced sleep efficiency had a higher body mass index and shorter sleep duration. In the multivariable analysis, reduced sleep efficiency was significantly related to an increased prevalence of hypertension (OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.15–2.28). In conclusion, reduced sleep efficiency was significantly related to an increased prevalence of hypertension in Japanese adults. Improvements in sleep efficiency may be important to reduce blood pressure in Japanese adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-29
Number of pages7
JournalHypertension Research
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Jan 1

Keywords

  • Contactless biomotion sensor
  • Epidemiology
  • Home blood pressure
  • Sleep efficiency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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