Reduced default mode network connectivity relative to white matter integrity is associated with poor cognitive outcomes in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

Shigenori Kanno, Kun ichi Ogawa, Hiroaki Kikuchi, Masako Toyoshima, Nobuhito Abe, Kazushi Sato, Koichi Miyazawa, Ryuji Oshima, Satoru Ohtomo, Hiroaki Arai, Satoshi Shibuya, Kyoko Suzuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate whether default mode network (DMN) connectivity and brain white matter integrity at baseline were associated with severe cognitive impairments at baseline and poor cognitive outcomes after shunt placement in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). Methods: Twenty consecutive patients with iNPH whose symptoms were followed for 6 months after shunt placement and 10 healthy controls (HCs) were enrolled. DMN connectivity and brain white matter integrity at baseline in the patients with iNPH and HCs were detected by using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with independent component analysis and diffusion tensor imaging, respectively, and these MRI indexes were compared between the patients with iNPH and HCs. Performance on neuropsychological tests for memory and executive function and on the gait test was assessed in the patients with iNPH at baseline and 6 months after shunt placement. We divided the patients with iNPH into the relatively preserved and reduced DMN connectivity groups using the MRI indexes for DMN connectivity and brain white matter integrity, and the clinical measures were compared between the relatively preserved and reduced DMN connectivity groups. Results: Mean DMN connectivity in the iNPH group was significantly lower than that in the HC group and was significantly positively correlated with Rey auditory verbal learning test (RAVLT) immediate recall scores and frontal assessment battery (FAB) scores. Mean fractional anisotropy of the whole-brain white matter skeleton in the iNPH group was significantly lower than that in the HC group. The reduced DMN connectivity group showed significantly worse performance on the RAVLT at baseline and significantly worse improvement in the RAVLT immediate recall and recognition scores and the FAB scores than the preserved DMN connectivity group. Moreover, the RAVLT recognition score highly discriminated patients with relatively preserved DMN connectivity from those with relatively reduced DMN connectivity. Conclusions: Our findings indicated that iNPH patients with reduced DMN connectivity relative to the severity of brain white matter disruption have severe memory deficits at baseline and poorer cognitive outcomes after shunt placement. However, further larger-scale studies are needed to confirm these findings.

Original languageEnglish
Article number353
JournalBMC Neurology
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Dec
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Default mode network
  • Diffusion tensor imaging
  • Functional magnetic resonance imaging
  • Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus
  • Rey auditory verbal learning test

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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