Recovery curves for housing reconstruction in Sri Lanka after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami

Osamu Murao, Hideaki Nakazato

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

On the 26th of December 2004, the Tsunami damaged to five provinces in Sri Lanka and more than 40,000 people were displaced, lost, or killed within a short time. After the tsunami, the Government provided three types of houses for the victims (temporary shelters, transitional houses, and permanent houses). The authors conducted several field surveys and interviews in the damaged area to investigate the recovery conditions, and obtained dataset, which had been collected for 13 months since December 2004 by Rebuilding and Development Agency. It shows the construction status of transitional house and permanent house in the damaged areas. This paper demonstrates recovery curves for the transitional houses and the permanent houses. With the aim of constructing post-earthquake recovery curves for Sri Lanka, the factors of time (months) and completion ratio of building construction are used. The obtained curves quantitatively clarify the regional differences in the completion dates and processes of construction. The proposed quantitative methodology will be used for other damaged countries due to the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami. It means that this kind of analysis is essential for investigating post-disaster recovery process because it enables comparative studies of urban/rural planning among different types of post-disaster recovery processes throughout the world.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)51-60
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Earthquake and Tsunami
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Jun

Keywords

  • Recovery curves
  • Recovery process
  • Sri Lanka
  • The 2004 Sumatra tsunami

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oceanography
  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology
  • Geophysics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Recovery curves for housing reconstruction in Sri Lanka after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this