Recent Progress in Experimental Mineral Physics: Phase Relations of Hydrous Systems and the Role of Water in Slab Dynamics

Eiji Ohtani

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Water is stored in various hydrous minerals in subducting slabs. The series of hydrous minerals, which are stable in the peridotite layer of the slabs, can bring water into the transition zone in the cold slabs with temperature profiles below the choke point. Even along the geotherms passing above the choke point, slabs can bring water into the deeper mantle by several mechanisms, such as transport by hydrous phases in the basalt and sediment layers of slabs, K-bearing hydrous phases at the base of the mantle wedge, and the isolated fluid pockets. The water storage capacity is very low in the upper and lower mantles, whereas the transition zone has a large water storage capacity due to high water solubilities in wadsleyite and ringwoodite. Recent seismological observations suggest existence of hydrous slabs in the transition zone depth. The seismic reflectors observed in the upper part of the lower mantle beneath the Mariana subduction zone may be accounted for by the existence of the fluid-bearing basaltic layer with perovskite Ethology, where the fluid may be generated by dehydration of the hydrous phase D (phase G) in the underlying peridotite layer of the slab.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEarth's Deep Mantle
Subtitle of host publicationStructure, Composition, and Evolution
Publisherwiley
Pages321-334
Number of pages14
ISBN (Electronic)9781118666258
ISBN (Print)0875904254, 9780875904252
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Mar 29

Keywords

  • Earth-Mantle-Research
  • Heat-Convection, Natural-Research
  • Seismology-Research
  • Thermochemistry-Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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