Realistic three-dimensional left ventricular ejection determined from computational fluid dynamics

Tad W. Taylor, Haruka Okino, Takami Yamaguchi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A realistic model of the left ventricle of the heart was constructed using a cast from a dog heart which was in diastole. A coordinate measuring machine was used to measure and digitize the coordinates of the left ventricle. From the complex measured left ventricle shape values, a three dimensional finite volume representation was constructed using a simulation package. The left ventricular walls moved towards the center of the aortic outlet in order to study the effects of time varying left ventricular ejection. The left ventricular wall motion was assumed to follow the blood flow and the wall grid was reformed 25 times during the calculation. The 25.8 cc ventricular volume was reduced to 75% in 0.25 seconds. Centerline and cross-sectional velocity vectors greatly increased in magnitude at the aortic outlet, and most of the pressure occurred in the top 15% of the heart. The computational method should make is possible to compare simulation results with important measurement techniques such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging and this should allow a finer detail of flow understanding than is presently available using either a modeling or imaging method alone.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Bioengineering
EditorsJohn M. Tarbell
PublisherPubl by ASME
Pages119-122
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)0791810313
Publication statusPublished - 1993 Dec 1
EventProceedings of the 1993 ASME Winter Annual Meeting - New Orleans, LA, USA
Duration: 1993 Nov 281993 Dec 3

Publication series

NameAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED
Volume26

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1993 ASME Winter Annual Meeting
CityNew Orleans, LA, USA
Period93/11/2893/12/3

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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