Rapid appearance of resolvin precursors in inflammatory exudates: Novel mechanisms in resolution

Kie Kasuga, Rong Yang, Timothy F. Porter, Nitin Agrawal, Nicos A. Petasis, Daniel Irimia, Mehmet Toner, Charles N. Serhan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

177 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Resolution of inflammation is essential. Although supplementation of ω-3 fatty acids is widely used, their availability at sites of inflammation is not known. To this end, a multidisciplinary approach was taken to determine the relationship of circulating ω-3 to inflammatory exudates and the generation of resolution signals. In this study, we monitored resolvin precursors in evolving exudates, which initially paralleled increases in edema and infiltrating neutrophils. We also prepared novel microfluidic chambers to capture neutrophils from a drop of blood within minutes that permitted single-cell monitoring. In these, docosahexaenoic acid-derived resolvin D1 rapidly stopped neutrophil migration, whereas precursor docosahexaenoic acid did not. In second organ injury via ischemia-reperfusion, resolvin metabolically stable analogues were potent organ protectors reducing neutrophils. Together, these results indicate that circulating ω-3 fatty acids rapidly appear in inflammatory sites that require conversion to resolvins that control excessive neutrophil infiltration, protect organs, and foster resolution.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8677-8687
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume181
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Dec 15

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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    Kasuga, K., Yang, R., Porter, T. F., Agrawal, N., Petasis, N. A., Irimia, D., Toner, M., & Serhan, C. N. (2008). Rapid appearance of resolvin precursors in inflammatory exudates: Novel mechanisms in resolution. Journal of Immunology, 181(12), 8677-8687. https://doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.181.12.8677