Quantitative evaluation of the effect of visually-induced motion sickness using causal coherence function between blood pressure and heart rate

N. Sugita, M. Yoshizawa, A. Tanaka, K. Abe, S. Chiba, T. Yambe, S. Nitta

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To evaluate the effect of visually-induced motion sickness on the human, blood pressure variability (BP) and heart rate variability (HR) of 51 normal subjects watching a 15min-long video image taken by a vibrating handy camera were analyzed. Not only coherence function (K2) between BP and HR but also two causal coherence functions: KBP→HR2 from BP to HR and KBP→HR2 from HR to BP were introduced to divide causal linearity of the cardiovascular system regarded as a closed-loop system. K2 represents total linearity of the system. K BP→HR2 and KBP→HR2 correspond to the baroreflex system and the mechanical hemodynamics, respectively. The results revealed that KBP→HR2 at the Mayer wave-band (around 0.1 Hz) of the subjects prone to motion sickness decreased gradually and was significantly lower than that of the subjects not prone to in later scenes. This result has never been obtained from conventional methods dealing with a cardiovascular system as an open-loop system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2407-2410
Number of pages4
JournalAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
Volume26 IV
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Dec 1
EventConference Proceedings - 26th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2004 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: 2004 Sep 12004 Sep 5

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Causal coherence function
  • Heart rate
  • Motion sickness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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