Psychological Practices and Religiosity (Shukyosei) of People in Communities Affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami

Chizuko Saito, Tetsuo Ohmura, Hiroshi Higuchi, Shizuka Sato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article reflects on certain cultural phenomena in the aftermath of the Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011 and discusses the significant role of Japanese religiosity (shukyosei) in mental health care practices. The authors introduce these cultural phenomena by presenting (1) the results of a survey related to the ritual of giving graduation certificates to children lost in the earthquake and (2) a case illustration reported by a Buddhist priest and clinical psychologist who performed many funeral services at a temporary morgue for the victims and their families. The issues of Japanese cultural contexts and the religiosity (shukyosei) of Japanese people will be also discussed. The authors propose that mental health care workers who engage in relief activities ought to understand the culturally and contextually sensitive religiosity of the people and community they are serving and explore ways to incorporate this religiosity in their clinical practices.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-253
Number of pages15
JournalPastoral Psychology
Volume65
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Apr 1

Keywords

  • Clinical psychology
  • Great East Japan earthquake
  • Japanese religiosity (shukyosei)
  • Mental health care after a disaster

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Religious studies
  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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