Pseudo-shock wave produced by backpressure in straight and diverging rectangular ducts

Kaname Kawatsu, Shunsuke Koike, Tsuyoshi Kumasaka, Goro Masuya, Kenichi Takita

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the present study, the PSW produced by the backpressure of the test section in straight and diverging ducts with rectangular cross section was numerically simulated to observe the structure of the PSW and the changes of flow field. Furthermore, velocity distributions around the first shock wave of the PSW were measured with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), and the results were compared with the numerical results. In the constant square area duct case, from both the numerical and experimental results, the separation of boundary layer by the first shock wave of PSW can be observed only near the corners of the duct. In contrast, in the diverging duct case the large separation region appeared at one corner of the upper wall and did not reattach to the wall in the test section.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationA Collection of Technical Papers - 13th AIAA/CIRA International Space Planes and Hypersonic Systems and Technologies Conference
PublisherAmerican Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc.
Pages764-774
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)1563477297, 9781563477294
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005
Event13th AIAA/CIRA International Space Planes and Hypersonic Systems and Technologies Conference - Capua, Italy
Duration: 2005 May 162005 May 20

Publication series

NameA Collection of Technical Papers - 13th AIAA/CIRA International Space Planes and Hypersonic Systems and Technologies Conference
Volume2

Conference

Conference13th AIAA/CIRA International Space Planes and Hypersonic Systems and Technologies Conference
CountryItaly
CityCapua
Period05/5/1605/5/20

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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