Prognostic significance of blood pressure and heart rate variabilities: The Ohasama Study

Masahiro Kikuya, Atsushi Hozawa, Takayoshi Ohokubo, Ichiro Tsuji, Mari Michimata, Mitsunobu Matsubara, Masahiro Ota, Kenichi Nagai, Tsutomu Araki, Hiroshi Satoh, Sadayoshi Ito, Shigeru Hisamichi, Yutaka Imai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

479 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To investigate the association between cardiovascular mortality and short-term variabilities in blood pressure and heart rate, we performed a long-term prospective study of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in Ohasama, Japan, starting in 1987. We obtained ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate in 1542 subjects ≥40 years of age. Blood pressure and heart rate variabilities were estimated as a standard deviation measured every 30 minutes by ambulatory monitoring. There were 67 cardiovascular deaths during the follow-up period (mean=8.5 years). The Cox proportional hazards model, adjusted for possible confounding factors, demonstrated a significant increase in cardiovascular mortality, with an increase in daytime systolic ambulatory blood pressure variability. A similar trend was observed in daytime diastolic and nighttime ambulatory blood pressures. Cardiovascular mortality rate increased linearly, with a decrease in daytime heart rate variability. Subjects in whom the daytime systolic ambulatory blood pressure variability was larger than third quintile and the daytime heart rate variability was lower than the mean - SD were at extremely high risk of cardiovascular mortality. The blood pressure and heart rate variabilities obtained every 30 minutes by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring were independent predictors for cardiovascular mortality in the general population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)901-906
Number of pages6
JournalHypertension
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Keywords

  • Ambulatory monitoring
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Cohort study
  • Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Prognostic significance of blood pressure and heart rate variabilities: The Ohasama Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this