Prognostic impacts of plasma levels of cyclophilin a in patients with coronary artery disease

Tomohiro Ohtsuki, Kimio Satoh, Junichi Omura, Nobuhiro Kikuchi, Taijyu Satoh, Ryo Kurosawa, Masamichi Nogi, Shinichiro Sunamura, Nobuhiro Yaoita, Tatsuo Aoki, Shunsuke Tatebe, Koichiro Sugimura, Jun Takahashi, Satoshi Miyata, Hiroaki Shimokawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - Cyclophilin A (CyPA) is secreted from vascular smooth muscle cells, inflammatory cells, and activated platelets in response to oxidative stress. We have recently demonstrated that plasma CyPA level is a novel biomarker for diagnosing coronary artery disease. However, it remains to be elucidated whether plasma CyPA levels also have a prognostic impact in such patients. Approach and Results - In 511 consecutive patients undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography, we measured the plasma levels of CyPA, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), and brain natriuretic peptide and evaluated their prognostic impacts during the follow-up (42 months, interquartile range: 25-55 months). Higher CyPA levels (≥12 ng/mL) were significantly associated with all-cause death, rehospitalization, and coronary revascularization. Higher hsCRP levels (≥1 mg/L) were also significantly correlated with the primary end point and all-cause death, but not with rehospitalization or coronary revascularization. Similarly, higher brain natriuretic peptide levels (≥100 pg/mL) were significantly associated with all-cause death and rehospitalization, but not with coronary revascularization. Importantly, the combination of CyPA (≥12 ng/mL) and hsCRP (≥1 mg/L) was more significantly associated with all-cause death (hazard ratio, 21.2; 95% confidence interval, 4.9-92.3,; P<0.001) than CyPA (≥12 ng/mL) or hsCRP (≥1 mg/L) alone. Conclusions - The results indicate that plasma CyPA levels can be used to predict all-cause death, rehospitalization, and coronary revascularization in patients with coronary artery disease and that when combined with other biomarkers (hsCRP and brain natriuretic peptide levels), the CyPA levels have further enhanced prognostic impacts in those patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)685-693
Number of pages9
JournalArteriosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biology
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Biomarker
  • Brain
  • Coronary artery disease
  • Natriuretic peptide
  • Prognosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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