Prevalence of hepatitis B antigens in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 seropositive and seronegative pregnant women in Zambia

H. Oshitani, F. C. Kasolo, M. Mpabalwani, K. Mizuta, N. P. Luo, H. Suzuki, Y. Numazaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During April-October 1992 in Zambia, 1861 pregnant women attending prenatal clinics in 3 urban health centers in Lusaka and 5 district hospitals in various provinces were recruited to examine the association between HIV infection and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. 340 (18.3%) tested positive for HIV infection. HIV-positive pregnant women were more likely to test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) than were HIV-negative pregnant women, but the difference was not significantly different (7.1% vs. 5.4%; p = 0.23). On the other hand, among the HBsAg-positive pregnant women, HIV- infected women were more likely to test positive for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) than were HIV-negative women (25% vs. 12.3%; p 0.05), suggesting more HBV replication in HIV-infected people. Only women younger than 30 tested positive for HBeAg. If HIV does indeed facilitate HBV replication and increases its rate of vertical transmission, the HBV epidemiological pattern in sub-Saharan African could change. Further studies focusing on the epidemiological impact of HIV on HBV infection in sub-Saharan Africa are needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)235-236
Number of pages2
JournalTransactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume90
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1996 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Hepatitis B virus
  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Interaction
  • Pregnancy
  • Prevalence
  • Transmission
  • Zambia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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