Prevalence and Species Identity of Trypanorhyncha in Cultured and Wild Amberjack, Seriola spp. in Hawaii-Implications for Aquaculture

Clyde S. Tamaru, Ruthellen C. Klinger-Bowen, Kazuo Ogawa, Takashi Iwaki, Akira Kurashima, Naoki Itoh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The advent of molecular technologies allow for identification of organisms that were previously challenging or not possible. Conventional polymerase chain reaction analyses of a segment of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene from trypanorhynch plerocerci obtained from cultured and wild caught amberjacks, Seriola dumerili, and Seriola rivoliana of the family Carangidae from Hawai'i and Japan were found to be 100% identical, indicating that the cestodes from Japan and Hawai'i are the same species, Protogrillotia zerbiae. The prevalence of the trypanorhynch plerocerci found in the musculature of Hawai'i wild-caught S. dumerili and S. rivoliana was 86.9 and 72.7%, respectively. In stark contrast, no trypanorhynch plerocerci have been detected in S. rivoliana cultured in Hawai'i and they are only rarely seen in S. dumerili cultured in Japan. Trypanorhynch plerocerci are part of a complex life cycle that involves the transmission in at least two intermediate hosts before finally residing in a host shark species. The results of this study indicate that artificial propagation of the amberjacks using manipulated diets has most likely disrupted the life cycle of this tapeworm, thus reducing the prevalence of this parasite in farmed amberjacks and enhancing the marketability of cultured amberjack.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)42-50
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the World Aquaculture Society
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Feb 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • Agronomy and Crop Science

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