Preserved regional cerebral blood flow in the occipital cortices, brainstem, and cerebellum of patients with V180I-129M genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in serial SPECT studies

Yuichi Hayashi, Nobuaki Yoshikura, Akira Takekoshi, Megumi Yamada, Takahiko Asano, Akio Kimura, Katsuya Satoh, Tetsuyuki Kitamoto, Takashi Inuzuka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) with a causative point mutation of valine to isoleucine at codon 180 (V180I) is one of the major types of genetic CJD (gCJD) in Japan. V180I gCJD is rarely accompanied by a family history, and its clinical characteristics include late-onset, long disease duration, and edematous cortical hyperintensity in diffusion, fluid attenuate inversion and T2-weighted MRI. We performed serial imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and MRI in three V180I gCJD cases over long-term observation. All cases were characterized by progressive dementia, parkinsonism, and the absence of cerebellar signs or cortical visual dysfunction in their clinical courses. Moreover, during the end-stage, SPECT findings showed preserved regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the occipital cortices, brainstem, and cerebellum. Similarly, no apparent atrophy or increased signal intensities were observed in MRI images of the occipital and cerebellar regions. In conclusion, we report a decrease in rCBF predominantly in the frontal and temporal cortices during the early-stage, which became more widespread as the disease progressed. Importantly, rCBF was preserved in the occipital cortices, brainstem, and cerebellar regions until the end-stage, which may be distinct to V180I gCJD cases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)145-151
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the neurological sciences
Volume370
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Nov 15

Keywords

  • End-stage
  • MRI
  • SPECT
  • V180I genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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