Preliminary study of eye tracking to investigate the differences in gaze behaviors depending on the experience of neuroendovascular therapy

Masaaki Shojima, Yoshihiro Okamoto, Kuniyasu Niizuma, Makoto Ohta, Osamu Ishikawa, Ayano Fujisawa, Hiroyuki Tsukihara, Nobuyuki Sakai, Teiji Tominaga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Neuroendovascular therapy is now the choice for the management of many neurovascular pathologies, and physicians with endovascular skills are in high demand. In addition to the traditional method of practicing hand movements to learn skills, a new strategy of practicing eye movements to learn skills is also attracting attention. This preliminary study explored the differences in gaze behavior depending on experience with endovascular procedures to be facilitated in future skill training in neuroendovascular therapy. Methods: Four physicians with experience of 3-412 neuroendovascular procedures wore eye-tracking devices during coil embolization of swine cervical arteries. Gaze metrics with direct correlations to the expertise of endovascular procedures were explored. Results: Gaze metrics with a positive direct correlation to experience included the proportion of fixation durations (PFD) in the screen area and the native images. Those with a negative direct correlation included the PFD in the off-screen area and the roadmap images and the average fixation durations in the off-screen and coil areas. During the parent artery occlusion procedure with detachable coils, more experienced operators preferred to look at native images rather than roadmap images and that less experienced operators tended to look down at their hands more frequently. Conclusion: This preliminary study demonstrated the feasibility of eye tracking to identify the differences in gaze behavior depending on the experience of endovascular procedures and may guide future eye-tracking studies in neuroendovascular therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Article number351
JournalSurgical Neurology International
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Oct 15

Keywords

  • Coil embolization
  • Experience
  • Eye tracking
  • Gaze behavior
  • Skill learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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