Predominant involvement of ipsilateral anterior and posterior circulations in moyamoya disease

Shunji Mugikura, Shoki Takahashi, Shuichi Higano, Reizo Shirane, Yoshiharu Sakurai, Shogo Yamada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Purpose - We encountered several patients with childhood onset of moyamoya disease in whom the ipsilateral anterior and posterior circulations were predominantly involved. This study investigated whether this is an angiographic characteristic of this disease. Methods - We evaluated steno-occlusive lesions on angiograms of 85 patients with pediatric onset of moyamoya disease, using two 4-stage angiographic classification scales for the internal carotid artery and posterior cerebral artery systems (ICA and PCA staging, respectively) and determined whether lesions with more advanced ICA and PCA stages were on ipsilateral sides. Results - When positive laterality was defined as the presence of a difference by ≥1 stage between the stages on both sides, lateralities in the ICA stages and in the PCA stages were present in 40 (47%) and 27 patients (32%), respectively. Lesions with more advanced ICA and PCA stages were on the same side, with significant probability (P=0.024, Fisher's exact test). Lateralities in both ICA and PCA lesions were found in 17 patients. In 14 (82%) of the 17 patients, the more advanced side of ICA lesions was the same as that of PCA lesions, while it was contralateral in 3 patients (18%). Conclusions - In pediatric-onset moyamoya disease, asymmetrical involvement of bilateral ICAs and PCAs was common, and the ipsilateral ICA and PCA tended to be predominantly involved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1497-1500
Number of pages4
JournalStroke
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Keywords

  • Angiography
  • Cerebrovascular disorder
  • Child
  • Moyamoya disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Advanced and Specialised Nursing

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