Predation pressure on the siphons of the bivalve Nuttallia olivacea by the juvenile stone flounder Platichthys bicoloratus in the Natori River estuary, north-eastern Japan

Koichi Sasaki, Makoto Kudo, Takeshi Tomiyama, Kinuko Ito, Michio Omori

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    20 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The predation pressure on the siphons of the bivalve Nuttallia olivacea by the juvenile stone flounder Platichthys bicoloratus in the Natori River estuary, Miyagi, was estimated from both sides of the predator-prey relationship to analyze the specific relationship in which predators remove a part of the prey. Feeding experiments determined the feeding rate required to achieve the growth of juvenile stone flounders in the field. A juvenile cropped siphon tips at a mean of 56 per day from March to early July. The siphon tips that a juvenile consumed in a season amounted to 6375 pieces (6.2 g). In terms of predation, the duration since the last cropping in the field from the regeneration of cropped siphons was analyzed. The mean cropping rate of 0.211 times a day per clam in an area of intensive predation indicated that a clam was cropped 25.8 times (22.1 mg) in a season by fishes. The mean cropping rate by juvenile stone flounders was estimated to be 0.160 times a day. Of the 25.8 croppings, 19.5 (16.9 of the 22.1 mg) could be attributed to juvenile stone flounders. The results proved that a juvenile stone flounder preyed on approximately 370 clams in a season.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)104-116
    Number of pages13
    JournalFisheries Science
    Volume68
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2002

    Keywords

    • Estuary
    • Nuttallia olivacea
    • Platichthys bicoloratus
    • Predator-prey relationship
    • Siphon cropping

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Aquatic Science

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