Potential map for rice planting of East Africa

Ichiro Nakagawa, Katsuya Yabe, Genya Saito, Chinatsu Yonezawa, Sigeo Ogawa

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Recently, demanding of rice in East Africa is increasing. Chronic food shortages continue in Africa, because agricultural production dose not increase and growth of population is continuing. Recently, demanding for high production is increasing. Northern area of East Africa is dry region. Dry region is not adapted to rice production. It is difficult to cultivate rice in plateau area by cold-weather damage. It will be base of popularization and become clear to resolve point of rice cropping in East Africa by estimate rice cropping area and make map of that. There is large savanna in East Africa, so for the most part of land would be classed as grassland. In the case of upland cropping area, density of plants would be small. We cannot make potential rice cropping area only land-cover classification. To make that, we have to use soil fertility and soil moisture. And suitable temperature and rainfall would be need, so these are deferent by elevation. We make potential map for rice planning of East Africa using these data.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication30th Asian Conference on Remote Sensing 2009, ACRS 2009
    Pages1219-1224
    Number of pages6
    Publication statusPublished - 2009 Dec 1
    Event30th Asian Conference on Remote Sensing 2009, ACRS 2009 - Beijing, China
    Duration: 2009 Oct 182009 Oct 23

    Publication series

    Name30th Asian Conference on Remote Sensing 2009, ACRS 2009
    Volume2

    Other

    Other30th Asian Conference on Remote Sensing 2009, ACRS 2009
    Country/TerritoryChina
    CityBeijing
    Period09/10/1809/10/23

    Keywords

    • Kenya
    • Land-use
    • Rice crop

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Computer Networks and Communications

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