Postischemic changes of [3H]nimodipine and [3H]ryanodine binding in the gerbil striatum and hippocampus

T. Araki, H. Kato, K. Shuto, Y. Oshima, Y. Itoyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sequential alterations of [3H]nimodipine and [3H]ryanodine binding in gerbils were investigated in selectively vulnerable regions, such as the striatum and hippocampus, 1 h to 7 days after 10 min of transient cerebral ischemia. [3H]Nimodipine binding showed no significant changes in the striatum and hippocampus up to 48 h after ischemia. Seven days after ischemia, however, a severe reduction in [3H]nimodipine binding was observed in the dorsolateral striatum, hippocampal CA1 (stratum oriens, stratum pyramidale and stratum radiatum) and hippocampal CA3 sector. On the other hand, [3H]ryanodine binding showed a significant increase in the hippocampus 1 h after ischemia. Five hours after ischemia, a significant reduction in [3H]ryanodine binding was observed only in the hippocampal CA1 sector. Thereafter, the striatum and hippocampus showed no significant alterations in [3H]ryanodine binding up to 48 h after ischemia. After 7 days, a marked reduction in [3H]ryanodine binding was observed in the striatum and hippocampus which were particularly vulnerable to ischemia. These results demonstrate that postischemic alteration in [3H]nimodipine and [3H]ryanodine binding is produced with different processes in the hippocampus. They also suggest that the mechanism for striatal cell damage caused by transient cerebral ischemia may, at least in part, differ from that for hippocampal neuronal damage. Furthermore, our findings suggest that abnormal calcium release from intracellular stores may play a pivotal role in the development of hippocampal neuronal damage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)195-201
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Neurology
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998

Keywords

  • Cerebral ischemia
  • Gerbil
  • Nimodipine
  • Receptor autoradiography
  • Ryanodine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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