Population and genetic status of a critically endangered species in Korea, Euchresta japonica (Leguminosae), and their implications for conservation

Hyeok Jae Choi, Shingo Kaneko, Masashi Yokogawa, Gwan Pil Song, Dae Shin Kim, Shin Ho Kang, Yoshihisa Suyama, Yuji Isagi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The conservation status of Euchresta japonica Hook. f. ex Regel in Korea was investigated, with an emphasis on its genetic diversity. From field surveys, we obtained the only locality record for a wild population in Korea, which contained eight individuals. Genotyping was performed using nine microsatellite markers for all 20 remaining individuals, including those in ex situ collections. Among nine microsatellite loci that amplified within this group, five showed polymorphism with low hererozygosities, and a total of 12 multilocus genotypes were detected. Wild-specific alleles were detected in two individuals, and ex situ-specific alleles were detected in six individuals. Five individuals proved to have individual-specific alleles. The Korean population was also distinguished from the previously reported Japanese population by different alleles and higher diversity. To conserve this species more effectively in Korea, we recommend the following: (1) fencing the remaining wild population; (2) no relocation of wild individuals, as nine ex situ plants are already available; (3) complete ex situ conservation of all genetic diversity via clonal propagation of wild individuals; and (4) continuous protection and monitoring of the wild population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)251-257
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Plant Biology
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Aug

Keywords

  • Conservation
  • Endangered species
  • Genetic diversity
  • Korea
  • Microsatellite

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

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