Plasmon-resonant microchip emitters and their applications to terahertz spectroscopy

T. Otsuji, Y. Tsuda, T. Komori, T. Nishimura, A. El Fatimy, Y. M. Meziani, T. Suemitsu, E. Sano

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper reviews recent advances in emission of THz radiation from our original dual-grating gate high-electron mobility transistors (HEMT's) originated from two-dimensional plasmons. The dual grating gates can alternately modulate the 2D electron densities to periodically distribute the plasmonic cavities along the channel, acting as an antenna. The sample was fabricated with standard GaAs-based heterostructure material systems, succeeding in emission of broadband (0.5 to 6.5 THz) radiation even at room temperature from self-oscillating 2D plasmons under appropreate DC-bias conditions. Currently maximum available THz output power is estimated to be on the order of 1 to 10 μW from a single die active area of 75 × 75 μm2 with an excellent power conversion efficiency of 10-3. The fabricated device was introduced to the Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy as a microchip THz source. Water-vapor absorption spectrum was successfully observed at 300 K, which is proven to the standard data provided by NASA.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProgress in Electromagnetics Research Symposium 2009, PIERS 2009 Beijing
PublisherElectromagnetics Academy
Pages1-5
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9781618390554
Publication statusPublished - 2009
EventProgress in Electromagnetics Research Symposium 2009, PIERS 2009 Beijing - Beijing, China
Duration: 2009 Mar 232009 Mar 27

Publication series

NameProgress in Electromagnetics Research Symposium
Volume1
ISSN (Print)1559-9450

Other

OtherProgress in Electromagnetics Research Symposium 2009, PIERS 2009 Beijing
CountryChina
CityBeijing
Period09/3/2309/3/27

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Plasmon-resonant microchip emitters and their applications to terahertz spectroscopy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this