Plasma homocysteine and risk of coexisting silent brain infarction in Alzheimer's disease

Toshifumi Matsui, Miyako Nemoto, Masahiro Maruyama, Takefumi Yuzuriha, Hiroshi Yao, Haruko Tanji, Mari Ootsuki, Naoki Tomita, Sachio Matsushita, Susumu Higuchi, Yo Ichi Yoshida, Takashi Seki, Koh Iwasaki, Katsutoshi Furukawa, Hiroyuki Arai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Cerebrovascular disease is common in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Elevated plasma homocysteine (pHcy) levels are reported to be associated with an increased risk of poor cognition and dementia. Objective: To determine whether high pHcy levels are associated with an increased risk of coexisting silent brain infarctions (SBIs) in AD. Methods: Study population comprising 143 outpatients with clinical diagnosis of probable AD (73.3 ± 7.0 years) were classified into 2 groups according to the presence or absence of SBIs on magnetic resonance imaging. Results: SBIs were noted in 32.9% (47/143) of the AD patients. The pHcy levels in the AD with SBIs (14.0 ± 4.5 μmol/l) were significantly elevated compared with the AD without SBIs (11.7 ± 4.7 μmol/l, p = 0.007). After adjusting for age and gender, high pHcy (>12.4 μmol/l), but not hypertension, was associated with an increased risk of developing SBIs in AD (OR = 4.61, 95% CI = 1.74-12.2, p = 0.002). However, age at onset, cognitive function, cerebrospinal tau or amyloid β-peptide 1-42 levels were not significantly correlated with pHcy levels in AD. Conclusion: SBIs commonly coexist with AD, and may be a unique vascular condition in which homocysteine plays an important role. Homocysteine-lowering therapy rather than antihypertensive medication might be an appropriate strategy to prevent stroke associated with AD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-304
Number of pages6
JournalNeurodegenerative Diseases
Volume2
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 May
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Elevated plasma homocysteine levels
  • Silent brain infarctions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Plasma homocysteine and risk of coexisting silent brain infarction in Alzheimer's disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this