Pine stumps act as hotspots for seedling regeneration after pine dieback in a mixed natural forest dominated by Chamaecyparis obtusa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Over the past few decades, rural forest ecosystems in Japan have experienced dynamic vegetation changes due to forest dieback and changes in land use, leading to the loss of local species populations and biodiversity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the importance of pine (Pinus densiflora) stumps and logs for tree seedling regeneration in a mixed natural forest in Kyoto Prefecture, Japan, that had previously experienced severe pine dieback, and to determine which factors most greatly affect seedling establishment. Seedlings of 17 tree species were recorded on pine stumps and logs in later stages of decay, among which Chamaecyparis obtusa and Rhododendron reticulatum were most dominant. Both of these species had a greater density on pine stumps than on logs or soil, despite stumps covering less than 0.5% of the study area. In addition, the seedling densities of both species were positively associated with moss cover on coarse woody debris, but negatively associated with wood pH. Brown rot in the sapwood and heartwood, which occurred more frequently in stumps than in logs, also positively associated with the seedling densities of both species. Predictive modelling showed that C. obtusa seedlings exhibited a stronger response to pH in stumps than in logs. Therefore, since brown-rotted wood is acidic due to fungal decay activities, brown-rotted pine stumps may present hotspots of C. obtusa seedling regeneration at the study site.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1169-1179
Number of pages11
JournalEcological Research
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Nov 1

Keywords

  • Brown rot
  • Coarse woody debris
  • Hinoki cypress
  • Pine wilt disease
  • Rhododendron

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Pine stumps act as hotspots for seedling regeneration after pine dieback in a mixed natural forest dominated by Chamaecyparis obtusa'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this