Physiological positioning strategy alters condylar position after mandibular ramus sagittal split osteotomies for mandibular prognathism

Seigo Ohba, Hiroya Ozaki, Kei ichirou Miura, Takamitsu Koga, Takako Kawasaki, Noriaki Yoshida, Izumi Asahina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to elucidate the physiological position of the proximal segment for postoperative jaw movement in patients with mandibular prognathism. Methods: Twenty-two patients with mandibular prognathism were treated by orthognathic surgery using bilateral mandibular sagittal split ramus osteotomies (SSRO) with a physiological positioning strategy. The skeletal stability was assessed, and the movement of the proximal segment was evaluated by cephalography and computed tomography performed preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and one year postoperatively. Results: The patients were divided into two groups: the stable group (SNB relapse <1.5°) and the relapse group (SNB relapse ≥1.5°). In the stable group at one year postoperatively, the average SNB relapse was only 0.29° (7%), the condylar head had moved posteriorly by 0.75 mm, and the proximal segment had rotated counterclockwise by 1.2°. Conclusion: This new physiological positioning strategy improves the position of the condyle compared with the preoperative position in patients with mandibular prognathism.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)181-188
Number of pages8
JournalCranio - Journal of Craniomandibular Practice
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 May 4
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Physiological positioning strategy (PPS)
  • condylar head
  • mandibular prognathism
  • orthognathic surgery
  • physiological position
  • proximal segment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Dentistry(all)

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