Physical and psychological outcome in long-term survivors of childhood malignant solid tumor in Japan

Nami Honda, Shunichi Funakoshi, Hideo Ambo, Masaki Nio, Yutaka Hayashi, Hiroo Matsuoka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Few studies have assessed physical and psychological status in long-term survivors of childhood solid tumors in Japan. For children with such diseases diagnosed and treated in our hospital, our purpose was to clarify the physical and psychological status of long-term survivors and their parents. Methods: Subjects were 56 patients who were diagnosed at our institution as having a childhood malignant solid tumor between 1982 and 2005 and had been alive for at least 5 years after treatment. Surveys were sent and returned by mail. Results: Of the 56 patients surveyed, 32 responded. The current health condition and psychosocial status of survivors were evaluated as good by their parents. However, psychological tests revealed psychosocial problems in 28.1% of the children. Severe posttraumatic stress associated with the child's disease and its treatment was present in 15.6% of the parents. Conclusion: Physical status of long-term survivors of childhood malignant solid tumors was good in general. However, psychological tests revealed psychosocial problems in some of the children and posttraumatic stress in the parents. Considering the diversity of both the diseases and their clinical course, a qualitative study is warranted for further analysis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)713-720
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Surgery International
Volume27
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Jul

Keywords

  • Childhood malignant solid tumor
  • Late effect
  • Long-term survivors
  • Psychological problems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Surgery

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