Peak expiratory flow variability adjusted by forced expiratory volume in one second is a good index for airway responsiveness in asthmatics

Kazuto Matsunaga, Masae Kanda, Atsushi Hayata, Satoru Yanagisawa, Tomohiro Ichikawa, Keiichiro Akamatsu, Akira Koarai, Tsunahiko Hirano, Hisatoshi Sugiura, Yoshiaki Minakata, Masakazu Ichinose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The lowest peak expiratory flow (PEF) over a week, expressed as a percentage of the highest PEF (Min%Max PEF) has been reported to be the index that most closely correlates with airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthmatics. However, both fluctuation of the airway caliber and airflow limitation are regarded as physiological properties of asthma closely related to AHR. An accurate index that shows the degree of AHR may be obtained by combining the index of airway lability with the parameters that represent airway caliber. Methods: Ninety-two steroid-naive and twenty-eight steroid-treated asthmatic patients were enrolled. Using the physiological parameters obtained from spirometry and PEF monitoring, we investigated, the indices which correlate accurately with airway responsiveness measured by the inhalation challenge test. Results: Although the methacholine threshold was related to all parameters that represent airway caliber and lability, Min%Max PEF had the strongest correlation with AHR. When Min%Max PEF was adjusted by the airway geometric factors, the normalization of Min%Max PEF with forced expiratory volume in one second as a percentage of the predicted value (%FEV1) improved the relationship between Min%Max PEF and AHR. Conclusions: Min%Max PEF adjusted by %FEV1 showed a good correlation with airway responsiveness measured by the inhalation challenge test, and may be useful as a convenient alternative index of AHR in asthmatic patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1107-1112
Number of pages6
JournalInternal Medicine
Volume47
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Nov 24

Keywords

  • Airflow limitation
  • Airway hyperresponsiveness
  • Airway lability
  • Bronchial asthma
  • Spirometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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