PDPN Is Expressed in Various Types of Canine Tumors and Its Silencing Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest in Canine Malignant Melanoma

Masahiro Shinada, Daiki Kato, Satoshi Kamoto, Sho Yoshimoto, Masaya Tsuboi, Ryohei Yoshitake, Shotaro Eto, Namiko Ikeda, Kohei Saeki, Yuko Hashimoto, Yosuke Takahashi, James Chambers, Kazuyuki Uchida, Mika K. Kaneko, Naoki Fujita, Ryohei Nishimura, Yukinari Kato, Takayuki Nakagawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Podoplanin (PDPN), a small transmembrane mucin-like glycoprotein, is ectopically expressed. It is also known to be linked with several aspects of tumor malignancy in some types of human tumors, including invasion, metastasis, and cancer stemness. However, there are few reports on the expression of dog PDPN (dPDPN) in canine tumors, and the association between dPDPN and tumor malignancy has not been elucidated. We identified that 11 out of 18 types of canine tumors expressed dPDPN. Furthermore, 80% of canine malignant melanoma (MM), squamous cell carcinoma, and meningioma expressed dPDPN. Moreover, the expression density of dPDPN was positively associated with the expression of the Ki67 proliferation marker. The silencing of dPDPN by siRNAs resulted in the suppression of cell migration, invasion, stem cell-like characteristics, and cell viability in canine MM cell lines. The suppression of cell viability was caused by the induction of apoptosis and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. Overall, this study demonstrates that dPDPN is expressed in various types of canine tumors and that dPDPN silencing suppresses cell viability through apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, thus providing a novel biological role for PDPN in tumor progression.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCells
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 May 5

Keywords

  • Ki67
  • apoptosis
  • cancer
  • cell cycle
  • melanoma
  • podoplanin
  • squamous cell carcinoma

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