Patient-derived orthotopic xenograft models for cancer of unknown primary precisely distinguish chemotherapy, and tumor-targeting S. typhimurium A1-R is superior to first-line chemotherapy

Kentaro Miyake, Tasuku Kiyuna, Masuyo Miyake, Kei Kawaguchi, Sang Nam Yoon, Zhiying Zhang, Kentaro Igarashi, Sahar Razmjooei, Sintawat Wangsiricharoen, Takashi Murakami, Yunfeng Li, Scott D. Nelson, Tara A. Russell, Arun S. Singh, Yukihiko Hiroshima, Masashi Momiyama, Ryusei Matsuyama, Takashi Chishima, Shree Ram Singh, Itaru EndoFritz C. Eilber, Robert M. Hoffman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cancer of unknown primary (CUP) is a recalcitrant disease with poor prognosis because it lacks standard first-line therapy. CUP consists of diverse malignancy groups, making personalized precision therapy essential. The present study aimed to identify an effective therapy for a CUP patient using a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) model. This paper reports the usefulness of the PDOX model to precisely identify effective and ineffective chemotherapy and to compare the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R with first-line chemotherapy using the CUP PDOX model. The present study is the first to use a CUP PDOX model, which was able to precisely distinguish the chemotherapeutic course. We found that a carboplatinum (CAR)-based regimen was effective for this CUP patient. We also demonstrated that S. typhimurium A1-R was more effective against the CUP tumor than first-line chemotherapy. Our results indicate that S. typhimurium A1-R has clinical potential for CUP, a resistant disease that requires effective therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Article number12
JournalSignal Transduction and Targeted Therapy
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Dec 1
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Cancer Research

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Patient-derived orthotopic xenograft models for cancer of unknown primary precisely distinguish chemotherapy, and tumor-targeting S. typhimurium A1-R is superior to first-line chemotherapy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this