Parity as a factor affecting the white-coat effect in pregnant women: The BOSHI study

Mami Ishikuro, Taku Obara, Hirohito Metoki, Takayoshi Ohkubo, Noriyuki Iwama, Mikiko Katagiri, Hidekazu Nishigori, Yoko Narikawa, Katsuyo Yagihashi, Masahiro Kikuya, Nobuo Yaegashi, Kazuhiko Hoshi, Masakuni Suzuki, Shinichi Kuriyama, Yutaka Imai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Parity has previously been reported to affect the difference in blood pressure (BP) measured in the office and at home, also known as the white-coat effect, during pregnancy. The objective of this study was to identify possible factors that cause the white-coat effect during pregnancy, focusing on parity. In total, 530 pregnant women (31.3±4.7 years old) who delivered at a maternal clinic were eligible for the study. The association between parity and the white-coat effect (clinic BP compared with home BP) was investigated for each trimester of pregnancy by multivariate analysis of covariance adjusted for age, body mass index, family history of hypertension and smoking habits. The magnitudes of the white-coat effect for systolic BP in the first, second and third trimesters were 4.1±9.8, 3.4±7.1 and 1.8±6.0 mm Hg, respectively and those for diastolic BP were 3.8±7.4, 1.6±5.8 and 2.4±4.9 mm Hg, respectively. Parity was significantly and negatively associated with the white-coat effect for systolic BP in the first trimester of pregnancy (nulliparous women: 5.07±0.61 mm Hg and multiparous women: 2.78±0.74 mm Hg, P=0.02) as well as for diastolic BP in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Age, body mass index, family history of hypertension and smoking were not significantly associated with the white-coat effect in any trimester of pregnancy. Parity may have an influence on the white-coat effect in pregnancy; however, the observed effect, on average 1-2 mm Hg, was small.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)770-775
Number of pages6
JournalHypertension Research
Volume38
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Nov 1

Keywords

  • home blood pressure
  • pregnancy
  • white-coat effect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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