Oral administration of K-11706 inhibits GATA binding activity, enhances hypoxia-inducible factor 1 binding activity, and restores indicators in an in vivo mouse model of anemia of chronic disease

Yoko Nakano, Shigehiko Imagawa, Ken Matsumoto, Christian Stockmann, Naoshi Obara, Norio Suzuki, Takeshi Doi, Tatsuhiko Kodama, Satoru Takahashi, Toshiro Nagasawa, Masayuki Yamamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Erythropoietin (Epo) gene expression is under the control of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), and is negatively regulated by GATA. Interlaukin 1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), which increase the binding activity of GATA and inhibit Epo promoter activity, are increased in patients with anemia of chronic disease (ACD). We previously demonstrated the ability of K-7174 (a GATA-specific inhibitor), when injected intraperitoneally, to improve Epo production that had been inhibited by IL-1β or TNF-α treatment. In the present study, we examined the ability of both K-11706, which inhibits GATA and enhances HIF-1 binding activity, and K-13144, which has no effect on GATA or HIF-1 binding activity, to improve Epo production following inhibition by IL-1β or TNF-α in Hep3B cells in vitro and in an in vivo mouse assay. Oral administration of K-11706 reversed the decreases in hemoglobin and serum Epo concentrations, reticulocyte counts, and numbers of erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-Es) induced by IL-1β or TNF-α. These results raise the possibility of using orally administered K-11706 for treating patients with ACD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4300-4307
Number of pages8
JournalBlood
Volume104
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Dec 15
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Immunology
  • Hematology
  • Cell Biology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Oral administration of K-11706 inhibits GATA binding activity, enhances hypoxia-inducible factor 1 binding activity, and restores indicators in an in vivo mouse model of anemia of chronic disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this