Optimal integration of photometric and geometric surface measurements using inaccurate reflectance/illumination knowledge

Takayuki Okatani, Koichiro Deguchi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, we present a method for accurately estimating the shape of an object by integrating the surface orientation measured by photometric stereo and the position measured by some range-measuring method. We first show that even if the knowledge of the reflectance/illumination is inaccurate, the first derivatives of the photometrically measured orientation can be accurately estimated at the surface points where they have small values. We propose a probabilistic framework to quantitate the (in)accuracy of the knowledge and connect it to the estimation accuracy of these derivatives. Based on this framework, we consider optimally integrating the surface orientation and position to obtain the object shape with higher accuracy. The integration reduces to an optimization problem, and it is efficiently solved by belief propagation. We present several experimental results showing the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2012 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR 2012
Pages254-261
Number of pages8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Event2012 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR 2012 - Providence, RI, United States
Duration: 2012 Jun 162012 Jun 21

Publication series

NameProceedings of the IEEE Computer Society Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
ISSN (Print)1063-6919

Other

Other2012 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR 2012
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityProvidence, RI
Period12/6/1612/6/21

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition

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