Optical coherence tomography-verified morphological correlates of high-intensity coronary plaques on non-contrast T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in patients with stable coronary artery disease

Tomoaki Kanaya, Teruo Noguchi, Fumiyuki Otsuka, Yasuhide Asaumi, Yu Kataoka, Yoshiaki Morita, Hiroyuki Miura, Kazuhiro Nakao, Masashi Fujino, Tomohiro Kawasaki, Kunihiro Nishimura, Teruo Inoue, Jagat Narula, Satoshi Yasuda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the coronary vessels allows for the characterization of the extent of luminal stenosis, plaque burden, and plaque instability.1 Recently, the presence of a high-intensity plaque (HIP) with a plaque-to-myocardial signal intensity ratio (PMR) of >-1.4 was shown to be a predictor of future coronary events in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD).2 Coronary HIPs with high PMR are found in up to one-third (28-36%) of patients with stable CAD.2,3 However, the mechanisms underlying the association between these lesions and adverse outcomes in patients with stable CAD are not fully understood. To define the morphological substrate of atherosclerotic coronary plaques producing HIPs with high PMR, we used intracoronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) to precisely identify underlying plaque characteristics.4-6 An ex vivo post-mortem histopathological study confirmed the accuracy of OCT for identifying various features of high-risk plaques including thin cap fibroatheroma (TCFA), lipidrich core, inflammation, neovascularization, healed plaque rupture, and luminal narrowing.4-10

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-83
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean heart journal cardiovascular Imaging
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • coronary artery disease
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • myocardial infarction
  • optical coherence tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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