Ontogeny of cholecystokinin-immunoreactive cells in the digestive tract of Atlantic halibut, Hippoglossus hippoglossus, larvae

Yuko Kamisaka, Masatomo Tagawa, Masaru Tanaka, Geir K. Totland, Ivar R�nnestad, Tadahide Kurokawa, Tohru Suzuki

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55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The appearance and distribution of cholecystokinin (CCK)-producing cells were investigated in the digestive tract of developing larvae of cultured Atlantic halibut, Hippoglossus hippoglossus. The CCK-producing cells were detected immunohistochemically, by use of a primary antiserum against CCK cloned for the Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus. No CCK-immunoreactive (IR) cells were detected in first-feeding larvae (33 days after hatching, DAH). Forty-five DAH or 12 days after first feeding, there were a few scattered CCK-IR cells in the epithelium of the anterior midgut in about 30% of the examined larvae. All larvae older than 52 DAH had CCK-IR cells in the anterior midgut, particularly frequent in the most anterior region adjacent to the pyloric caeca. No CCK-IR cells were detected in the foregut, the hindgut, or the midgut posterior to the first curvature. The CCK-IR cells spanned the intestinal epithelium from the basal lamina to the lumen and were triangular in shape, with the nucleus in the basal part and a thin apex toward the lumen. The mechanisms controlling release of bile, pancreatic enzymes, and peristalsis during the 12 days between first feeding and the first detection of CCK-IR cells remain to be clarified.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31-37
Number of pages7
JournalGeneral and Comparative Endocrinology
Volume123
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Digestive hormone
  • Distribution
  • Endocrine cells
  • Immunohistochemistry
  • Larval digestive physiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Endocrinology

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