Obesity-induced asthma: Role of free fatty acid receptors

Kentaro Mizuta, Atsuko Matoba, Sumire Shibata, Eiji Masaki, Charles W. Emala

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity is a major risk factor for the development of asthma, and worsens the key features of asthma including airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and airway remodeling. Although pro- and anti-inflammatory adipocytokines may contribute to the pathogenesis of asthma in obesity, the mechanistic basis for the relationship between asthma and obesity remains unclear. In obese individuals, the increased amount of adipose tissue results in the release of more long-chain free fatty acids as compared to lean individuals, causing an elevation in plasma long-chain free fatty acid concentrations. Recent findings suggest that the free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFAR1), which is a sensor of medium- and long-chain free fatty acids, is expressed on airway smooth muscle and plays a pivotal role in airway contraction and airway smooth muscle cell proliferation. In contrast, FFAR4, which is a sensor for long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and also expressed on airway smooth muscle, does not contribute to airway contraction and airway smooth muscle cell proliferation. Functional roles for short-chain fatty acid receptors FFAR2 and FFAR3 in the pathogenesis of asthma is still under debate. Taken together, adipose-derived long-chain free fatty acids may contribute to the pathogenesis of asthma in obesity through FFAR1.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)103-107
Number of pages5
JournalJapanese Dental Science Review
Volume55
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Nov

Keywords

  • Airway smooth muscle
  • Asthma
  • Free fatty acid receptor
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Obesity-induced asthma: Role of free fatty acid receptors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this