Nonstationary hot wire method with silica-coated probe for measuring thermal conductivities of molten metals

Eiji Yamasue, Masahiro Susa, Hiroyuki Fukuyama, Kazuhiro Nagata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The nonstationary hot wire method with a silica-coated probe has been developed to measure thermal conductivities of molten metals at high temperatures. Measurements were carried out on mercury and lead as test liquids. The thermal conductivities of liquid mercury ranged between 7.6 and 8.1 W/m K at temperatures between 273 and 293 K, and those of molten lead displayed constant values of about 15 W/m K at temperatures between 673 and 973 K. Factors affecting the thermal conductivity measurement using this method have been discussed. It has been concluded that the nonstationary hot wire method with an insulator-coated probe can be applied to various molten metals, as long as materials for probe coating are pertinent.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1971-1979
Number of pages9
JournalMetallurgical and Materials Transactions A: Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science
Volume30
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Metals and Alloys

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