Noninvasive stroke volume variation using electrical velocimetry for predicting fluid responsiveness in dogs undergoing cardiac surgery

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To evaluate the ability of a noninvasive cardiac output monitoring system with electrical velocimetry (EV) for predicting fluid responsiveness in dogs undergoing cardiac surgery. Study design Prospective experimental trial. Animals A total of 30 adult Beagle dogs. Methods Stroke volume (SV), stroke volume variation (SVV) and cardiac index were measured using the EV device in sevoflurane-anaesthetized, mechanically ventilated dogs undergoing thoracotomies for experimental creation of right ventricular failure. The dogs were considered fluid responsive if stroke volume (SVI; indexed to body weight), measured using pulmonary artery thermodilution, increased by 10% or more after volume loading (10 mL kg–1). Relationships of SVV, central venous pressure (CVP) and pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (PAOP) with SVI were analysed to estimate fluid responsiveness. Results Better prediction of fluid responsiveness, with a significant area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, was observed for SVV (0.85 ± 0.07; p = 0.0016) in comparison with CVP (0.65 ± 0.11; p = 0.17) or PAOP (0.60 ± 0.12; p = 0.35), with a cut-off value of 13.5% (84% specificity and 73% sensitivity). Conclusions and clinical relevance SVV derived from EV is useful for identification of dogs that are likely to respond to fluids, providing valuable information on volume status under cardiothoracic anaesthesia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)719-726
Number of pages8
JournalVeterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jul

Keywords

  • cardiac surgery
  • dog
  • electrical velocimetry
  • fluid therapy
  • haemodynamic monitoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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