Nondestructive sizing of a 3D surface crack generated in a railway component using closely coupled probes for direct-current potential drop technique

Makoto Akama, Masumi Saka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The direct-current potential drop technique was applied to the quantitative estimation of the size and shape of the crack generated in railway components. First, calibration equations that relate the potential drop to the crack depth and crack length along with its location were derived where the boundary element method was used for the electric potential problem. The crack depth, crack length and its location were then determined by analyzing an inverse problem by using the quasi-Newton method which compared the potential drop obtained by the calibration equations with measurements using a carbon steel specimen containing a crack. Although the values of depths were slightly scattered because depth estimations were sensitive to the crack location and changed with even a minimal change in distance between the crack and probes, the estimations of lengths and locations were adequate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)319-334
Number of pages16
JournalEngineering Fracture Mechanics
Volume72
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Jan 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

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