Non-volcanic seismic swarm and fluid transportation driven by subduction of the Philippine Sea slab beneath the Kii Peninsula, Japan Geofluid processes in subduction zones and mantle dynamics

Aitaro Kato, Atsushi Saiga, Tetsuya Takeda, Takaya Iwasaki, Toru Matsuzawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To understand the mechanism of an intensive non-volcanic seismic swarm in the Kii Peninsula, Japan, we used a dense seismic linear array to measure fine-scale variations of seismic velocities and converted teleseismic waves. A low-velocity anomaly confined to just beneath the seismic swarm area is clearly imaged, which correlates spatially with an uplifted surface area and a highly conductive and strong attenuative body. These results suggest that fluids such as partial melt or water are present beneath this non-volcanic seismic swarm area. It is notable that the island arc Moho below the seismic swarm area is at a depth of approximately 32 km in the northern part of the seismic swarm area and shallows to approximately 20 km towards the south, due to the raised structure of the serpentinized mantle wedge. In addition, we show that the hydrated oceanic crust of the subducting Philippine Sea slab is characterized by low velocities with a high Poisson's ratio at depths of less than 40 km. In contrast, dehydration conversion from oceanic basalt to eclogite takes place at depths greater than 50 km. Water released from the subducting oceanic crust could cause serpentinization of the mantle wedge and infiltration into the forearc base of the overlying plate. The interaction between dehydration of the subducting oceanic crust and hydration of the mantle wedge and overlying plate exerts an important role in driving the non-volcanic seismic swarm activity in the Kii Peninsula.

Original languageEnglish
Article number86
Journalearth, planets and space
Volume66
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Dec

Keywords

  • Dehydration of oceanic crust
  • Fluid
  • Non-volcanic seismic swarm
  • Serpentinized mantle wedge

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geology
  • Space and Planetary Science

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