Non-surgical approach to advanced chronic periodontitis: A 17.5-year case report

M. Kawamura, S. Sadamori, M. Okada, H. Sasahara, T. Hamada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This 17.5-year longitudinal case report details the treatment of advanced chronic periodontitis in a female patient commencing at 34 years of age. The woman was provided with periodontal care comprising of temporary fixation, scaling and root planing, intra-pocket irrigation using a root canal syringe and regular supervised maintenance. The patient presented with a 10-year history of bleeding gums. Therapy conducted in general practice had included simple curettage and irrigation. However, these treatments proved unsuccessful and the patient often changed dentists seeking better treatment. She presented to the University Dental Hospital, for diagnosis and treatment of her periodontal conditions after her mandibular lateral incisor had exfoliated. On presentation a purulent exudate could be expressed from all of the pockets. All anterior teeth, excluding the maxillary canines, demonstrated +2 to +3 mobility. The patient did not want any surgical treatment or her teeth extracted. It was decided to treat the patient conservatively without surgery. By postponing extraction, the authors were in a better position to determine the prognosis of the remaining teeth after the infection was under control. Although six teeth were extracted during the 17.5 years, this case report suggests that a non-surgical approach is a viable option while maintaining regular visits for periodontal care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)40-44
Number of pages5
JournalAustralian Dental Journal
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Mar

Keywords

  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Non-surgical approach
  • Periodontitis
  • Root canal syringe
  • Root planing
  • Scaling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

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