Nocturnal blood pressure during apnoeic and ventilatory periods in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea

Ye Tun, S. Okabe, W. Hida, H. Kurosawa, M. Tabata, Y. Kikuchi, K. Shirato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The exact nature of asleep blood pressure in relation to awake blood pressure is still unclear in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea. This study aimed: 1) to investigate the asleep blood pressure in both apnoeic and ventilatory periods; 2) to determine the diurnal and nocturnal factors correlated with the changes in blood pressure from apnoea to ventilatory periods during sleep. Thirty-two patients, newly diagnosed as moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea with a standard nocturnal polysomnography, were enrolled. The blood pressure was monitored by using the noninvasive continuous monitoring method during polysomnographic study. The mean blood pressures in ventilatory periods during nonrapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep were 117.5±17.9 mmHg and 128.8± 21.9 mmHg, and those in apnoea periods were 94.5±15.4 mmHg and 102.7±19.0 mmHg. The average blood pressure during NREM sleep (103.0±16.1 mmHg) was higher than the awake blood pressure (97.0±15.7 mmHg). The blood pressure during REM sleep was greater than that during NREM sleep. The changes in the nocturnal blood pressure from apnoea to ventilatory periods were inversely correlated with the age and nocturnal mean nadir saturation. In conclusion, patients with obstructive sleep apnoea have higher asleep blood pressure than awake blood pressure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1271-1277
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Respiratory Journal
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Keywords

  • Age
  • Desaturation
  • Haemodynamics
  • Nonrapid eye movement sleep
  • Rapid eye movement sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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