Nitrogen absorption into stainless steel weld metal under welding atmosphere of high pressure —nitrogen absorption into weld metal under welding atmosphere of high pressure (part 2)—

Takeshi Kuwana, Hiroyuki Kokawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

20Cr-10Ni stainless steel was welded in N2 and N2-Ar atmospheres at 1~30 atm pressures. Effects of welding conditions and the nitrogen partial pressure on the nitrogen content of stainless steel weld metal were systematically studied. The results are summarized as follows: (1) In the nitrogen welding atmosphere, the nitrogen content of the weld metal decreased with increasing the welding current and increasing the travel speed, and with decreasing the arc voltage. (2) In the nitrogen welding atmosphere, the nitrogen content of the weld metal increased with the nitrogen pressure, but the nitrogen absorption of the weld metal does not obey the Sieverts' law. (3) In N2-Ar welding atmosphere, the nitrogen content of the weld metal was lower in high atmospheric pressure than in low pressure at the same nitrogen partial pressure. (4) Using thermodynamic data obtained by equilibrium study, the nitrogen absorption into the stainless steel weld metal in the nitrogen atmosphere of high pressure was discussed. (5) All stainless steel weld metals had no porosity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)744-751
Number of pages8
Journalquarterly journal of the japan welding society
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1985 Jan 1

Keywords

  • Bead Shape
  • Chemical Reaction
  • High Pressure
  • Nitrogen Absorption
  • Nitrogen Atmosphere
  • Solubility of Nitrogen
  • Stainless Steel Weld Metal
  • Wire Melting Rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Metals and Alloys

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